Birds Are Able To Use Language Just Like Humans – New Study Suggests!

Language is a complex and unique combination of sounds put together in order to communicate thoughts to another. For a long time scientists believed that this power was possessed only by higher creatures who could understand how it works.

However, researchers how found with the help of a new study that some birds use tweets, clicks and other sounds just the way we humans use language to communicate.

From the University of Exeter, Andy Russell has claimed that this is the first evidence of this sort of behavior in animals that they are able to create sounds in different arrangements to create new meanings. This is the basic form of word generation. He adds that he would be amazed if other animals with this ability were also found.

And from the University of Zurich, Simon Townsend also agrees saying that this is a first that this ability, of rearranging meaningless elements giving them some meaning, has been discovered in another species besides humans.
Most blabber birds are known to hang out in groups of 6 to 20. They have distinct long-tails and are slim with an overall brown or greyish colour, streaked on the upper side.

The study conducted provided results which proved that blabber birds can make sounds that are not noises but can convey meaning to the other birds in the same way humans communicate with other humans.

Researchers also believe that blabber birds can differentiate between different sounds and associate them with different meanings.

Previous research has shown that particular animals, e.g. birds, are able to string different sounds together to form a complex tune or song but these sounds have been known to lack any particular meaning or message and changing or altering them will not change it overall message, says Sabrina Engesser of the University of Zurich.

She went on to add that in comparison to other songbirds, chestnut-crowned blabbers do not sing, they make discrete calls using smaller acoustically distinct sounds.

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