Paralyzed man can drink beer, play poker and do a handshake by controlling mechanical arm with his thoughts

A man paralyzed by gunfire over 10 years ago can shake hands, drink brew and play “rock, paper, scissors” by controlling a mechanical arm with his thoughts, scientists reported.

Two years prior, specialists in California embedded a couple of little chips into the mind of Erik Sorto that decoded his train of thoughts to move the mechanical arm. The 34-year-old has been working with scientists and occupational therapists to practice and calibrate his robotic arm movement. .

It’s the most recent attempt at making mind controlled prosthetic to help crippled individuals acquire freedom. In the most recent decade, a few individuals equipped with brain implants have utilized their mind to control a PC cursor or move prosthetic appendages.

Here are a few things to think about the new work, published Thursday by the journal Science:

Specialists at the University of Southern California embedded little chips into Sorto’s mind amid a five-hour surgery in 2013. The sensors recorded the electrical movement of around 100 mind cells as Sorto imagined grasping and reaching.

Researchers got some information about what he needed to do as opposed to separating the steps of what he wants to do, said essential specialist Richard Andersen at the California Institute of Technology.

After quite a while of imagining movements, Sorto practiced with Caltech experts and therapists at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center to move the automated arm, beginning with a handshake and graduating to more complex task. The sensors relayed their signals directly to the robotic arm and ignoring Sorto’s damaged spinal cord.

Researchers have since quite a while ago strived to make mechanical arms produce movements that are as regular as could reasonably be expected. Past research focused on an area of the brain known as the engine cortex, which controls movement.

The new work focused in on another area of cerebrum – the posterior parietal cortex – that is included in the arranging of movements. Their hope is that this procedure will result to smoother movements.

It’s not clear whether the new approach is better since there’s no nothing to compare it with yet. However it gives analysts a potential new targets in the mind.

In 2012, a Massachusetts lady incapacitated for a long time useda mechanical arm to get a jug of espresso and brought it to her lips. In another occasion, a quadriplegic man in Pennsylvania utilized a mechanical arm to give a high-five and stroke his better half’s hand.

A man paralyzed by gunshot more than a decade ago can shake hands, drink beer and play “rock, paper, scissors” by controlling a robotic arm with his thoughts, researchers reported.

Two years ago, doctors in California implanted a pair of tiny chips into the brain of Erik Sorto that decoded his thoughts to move the free-standing robotic arm. The 34-year-old has been working with researchers and occupational therapists to practice and fine-tune his movements.

It’s the latest attempt at creating mind-controlled prosthetics to help disabled people gain more independence. In the last decade, several people outfitted with brain implants have used their minds to control a computer cursor or steer prosthetic limbs.

Here are some things to know about the new work, published Thursday by the journal Science:

Doctors at the University of Southern California implanted small chips into Sorto’s brain during a five-hour surgery in 2013. The sensors recorded the electrical activity of about 100 brain cells as Sorto imagined reaching and grasping.

Researchers asked Sorto to think about what he wanted to do instead of breaking down the steps of the movements, said principal investigator Richard Andersen at the California Institute of Technology.

After weeks of imagining movements, Sorto trained with Caltech scientists and therapists at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center to move the robotic arm, starting with a handshake and graduating to more complicated tasks. The sensors relayed their signals to the arm, bypassing Sorto’s damaged spinal cord.

Scientists have long strived to make robotic arms produce movements that are as natural as possible. Previous research targeted a region of the brain known as the motor cortex, which controls movement.

The new work zeroed in on a different area of the brain – the posterior parietal cortex – that’s involved in the planning of movements. The hope is that this strategy will lead to smoother motions.

It’s unclear whether the new approach is better because no side-by-side comparisons have been made yet, but it gives researchers a potential new target in the brain.

In 2012, a Massachusetts woman paralyzed for 15 years directed a robotic arm to pick up a bottle of coffee and bring it to her lips. In another instance, a quadriplegic man in Pennsylvania used a robotic arm to give a high-five and stroke his girlfriend’s hand.

Image: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/

Sourtce: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/may/21/paralyzed-man-uses-his-thoughts-to-control-a-robot/

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