Large Hadron Collider is Ready after 2 Years of Upgrades for Another Worthwhile Mission

Scientists at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva said that the second run of the Large Hadron Collider is scheduled to begin next week with new experiments. However, the beams won’t go full circle until March 25 since it’s shut down in 2013 for power upgrades and equipment improvements which allows the generation of  more power to smash particles together as it searches for the vague dark believed to make-up most of the mass of the universe.

The apparatus is now ready to perform at its “design energy,” scientists have announced, which mean it’s ready for proton smashing experiments but with twice the power of the first run.

Scientists involved on experiments have taken steps to ensure that all the checking must be carried out and to not expect any proton beams until at least March 25.

They said this is still within schedule since the restart of the LHC was previously promised during the week of March 23.

However, restarting the LHC, will be a gradual process because every step is a critical process and should be threaded carefully.

The teams still don’t expect any particle collisions for the next two months even if the beams can accomplish laps across the LHC’s pipes, as this powerful process should take its time. CERN director general Rolf Heuer said LHC is practically a new machine.  Maintenance involved an elaborate examination of every single one of the intricate connections in the LHC’s 10,000 magnets that guide the proton beams into a perfect circle

These magnets are superconducting electromagnets frozen to -273 degrees Celsius to perform. But the inside of the beams, however, can become really hot, therefore they should be steady as a rock even if they turn from cold to warm or vice versa, he said.

Heuer said a very careful switching on of the high power laser since the energy from one beam alone energy can melt 500 kilograms of copper. Combined together, the beams can melt one ton of copper and we don’t want that to happen, he cautions.

Scientists at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva said that the second run of the Large Hadron Collider is scheduled to begin next week with new experiments. However, the beams won’t go full circle until March 25 since it’s shut down in 2013 for power upgrades and equipment improvements which allows the generation of  more power to smash particles together as it searches for the vague dark believed to make-up most of the mass of the universe.

The apparatus is now ready to perform at its “design energy,” scientists have announced, which mean it’s ready for proton smashing experiments but with twice the power of the first run.

Scientists involved on experiments have taken steps to ensure that all the checking must be carried out and to not expect any proton beams until at least March 25.

They said this is still within schedule since the restart of the LHC was previously promised during the week of March 23.

However, restarting the LHC, will be a gradual process because every step is a critical process and should be threaded carefully.

The teams still don’t expect any particle collisions for the next two months even if the beams can accomplish laps across the LHC’s pipes, as this powerful process should take its time. CERN director general Rolf Heuer said LHC is practically a new machine.  Maintenance involved an elaborate examination of every single one of the intricate connections in the LHC’s 10,000 magnets that guide the proton beams into a perfect circle

These magnets are superconducting electromagnets frozen to -273 degrees Celsius to perform. But the inside of the beams, however, can become really hot, therefore they should be steady as a rock even if they turn from cold to warm or vice versa, he said.

Heuer said a very careful switching on of the high power laser since the energy from one beam alone energy can melt 500 kilograms of copper. Combined together, the beams can melt one ton of copper and we don’t want that to happen, he cautions.

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