The New  York Law has Been Signed, Banning the Sale of E-Nicotine to Minors and to Ensure Containers are Child-Resistant As Well

 

The bill has been passed and is now a law. Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York signed it last Monday, prohibiting minors from buying liquid nicotine. The makers of liquid nicotine containers are also required to have them child-resistant. The law was the result of the death of a one year old early December in Fort Plains and was the first victim to die from drinking it.

“This action will help combat nicotine addiction by keeping it out of the hands of minors, as well as prevent a heartbreaking accident that can occur if a child is exposed to this potentially dangerous substance,” Cuomo said in a news release.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the effects of ingesting nicotine include vomiting, convulsions, and death. “This action will help combat nicotine addiction by keeping it out of the hands of minors, as well as prevent a heartbreaking accident that can occur if a child is exposed to this potentially dangerous substance,” Cuomo said in a news release.

The sale of e-cigarettes to minor was banned in 2010 by New York state legislators. However, there was no mention of the liquid additive that comes with them. The new law is very explicit about not only banning sale of the e-nicotine to minors but also about making the containers child-resistant as well. Companies who don’t follow the law about the containers will be fined up to $1,000.

The Centers for Disease Control has been particularly concerned about the liquid nicotine containers because of the calls it received concerning an increase in poison incidences from one once a month in September 2010 to two hundred fifteen in February 2014.

The problem does not lie on the process of selling tobacco products to minors but rather in the child’s ability to open the container with relative ease.

“When any of our tobacco products are scanned, our computer asks for the person’s date of birth,” said Mizan Shershah, an employee at Quick Mart in Hudson.

The computer on the register will scan any e liquid product. The computer will ask for the buyer’s identification which should be at least 21 years old.

According to Melissa Grau, assistant manager In Smoker’s Choice, which is located in Mid-Hudson, anyone who doesn’t look 27 years old needs to identify themselves before they can even enter the store. This, however, was not the case when a Reporter from Register-Star was able to enter the store without being stopped and asked to produce an ID.

“The law isn’t a bad idea”, Grau said, “but, “the nicotine shouldn’t have been in the infant’s reach anyway”. She was talking about the child who just recently died in Fort Plain.

 

The seal of the containers should be changed, which sell at prices ranging from $5.93 to $7.55 in the store.

The packaging bill was co-sponsored by Manhattan Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, which was voted by the New York State Legislature in June.

 

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *