Microsoft replaces the outdated Internet Explorer with Spartan in 2015

Once a dominant force in the web browser niche during its heydays, the outdated Internet Explorer of Microsoft has lost steam over the past many years and fizzled out on the brunt of competition offered by its main rivals Google Chrome and Mozilla Fire Fox.

The web browser is baffled by a lot of problems from security to archaic technology to inferior features. Though IE has made some improvements over the years it wasn’t good enough to pull the rug from under its vaunted rivals.

At to this moment the IE still doesn’t support extensions and useful toolbars that are present in Chrome and Firefox. The caveats doesn’t end there as it doesn’t fit into non-Windows devices  and will not work with other devices unlike Chrome and Firefox.

According to browser usage tracker StatCounter the Internet Explorer was consistent in registering skidding figures. The share of the once very popular web browser tumbled down to below 50% in 2010 and plummeted down further to less than 20% In October 20%.

Google Chrome is currently the pacesetter in the web browser segment as it commands a decent 48% share of the market.

Earlier this summer, Microsoft in a last ditch effort vowed to come up with essential changes to boost the stock of the Internet Explorer. But things has changed as Microsoft has just announced that the Internet Explorer will be replaced by a new web browser called the Spartan that will be rolled out alongside the Windows 10 in the near year and promises to be like Chrome and Firefox.

The Spartan browser’s structure is completely different from the Internet Explorer and this will implies that the new browser will be off to a good start and will not inherit any problems from its precursor.

Adoption to new web browser is sluggish for the vast majority of Company IT departments and government agencies and this is the reason why Internet Explorer was stuck at IE 8, a version that made its debut many moons ago in 2009.

In South Korea there is a law that was created in 1999 that had required the banks and business firms to employ digital certificates made by Microsoft especially the

Once a dominant force in the web browser niche during its heydays, the outdated Internet Explorer of Microsoft has lost steam over the past many years and fizzled out on the brunt of competition offered by its main rivals Google Chrome and Mozilla Fire Fox.

The web browser is baffled by a lot of problems from security to archaic technology to inferior features to bugs to being not as fast as its competitors. Though IE has made some improvements over the years it wasn’t good enough to pull the rug from under its vaunted rivals.

At to this moment the IE still doesn’t support extensions and useful toolbars that are present in Chrome and Firefox. The caveats doesn’t end there as it doesn’t fit into non-Windows devices  and will not work with other devices unlike Chrome and Firefox.

According to browser usage tracker StatCounter the IE was consistent in registering skidding figures. The share of the once very popular web browser tumbled down to below 50% in 2010 and plummeted down further to less than 20% In October 20%.

Google Chrome is currently the pacesetter in the web browser segment as it commands a decent 48% share of the market.

Earlier this summer, Microsoft in a last ditch effort vowed to come up with essential changes to boost the stock of the Internet Explorer. But things has changed as Microsoft has just announced that the IE will be replaced by a new web browser called the Spartan that will be rolled out alongside the Windows 10 in the near year and promises to be like Chrome and Firefox.

The Spartan browser’s structure is completely different from the IE and this will implies that the new browser will be off to a good start and will not inherit any problems from its precursor.

Adoption to new web browser is sluggish for the vast majority of Company IT departments and government agencies and this is the reason why Internet Explorer was stuck at IE 8, a version that made its debut many moons ago in 2009.

In South Korea there is a law that was created in 1999 that had required the banks and business firms to employ digital certificates made by Microsoft especially the IE. So this means that the demise of the IE will not be instant but in a gradual pace.

Microsoft has finally sensed that it is not worth investing on IE and in order to claw back into contention in the relatively web browser market it needs to come up with newly invigorated web browser that is versatile enough to compete with Chrome and Firefox.

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